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Trammell accused of trying to take deputy's gun

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BENTONVILLE -- A Rogers man, who was convicted as a teenager for killing his father with a cross bow, has been arrested after fighting with a sheriff's deputy for his gun.

The sheriff's deputy used his stun gun on Justin Trammell, 34, several times, but was only able to restrain Trammell with the assistance of two other people, according to court documents filed this morning.

Trammell, 34, was being held today in the Benton County Jail with a $250,000 bond set. He was arrested Monday in connection with aggravated assault, battery, endangering the welfare of a minor, no child passenger restraint, criminal trespass, driving while intoxicated-drugs, reckless driving, resisting arrest and obstructing governmental operations. Prosecutors have not filed formal charges against Trammell.

Darren Robertson, a Benton County sheriff's deputy, went Monday to a car crash at 12946 Minch Springs Road in the Garfield area, according to a probable cause affidavit.

Robertson saw two girls on the ground and a man talking on a cell phone, according to the affidavit. He kneeled down to care for the girls when he felt his gun being pulled on, according to court documents. Robertson pushed the man's hand away and the man continued to try and grab the gun. Robertson knocked him away by punching the man in the neck, according to the affidavit.

The man walked toward Robertson and the deputy pulled his stun gun and told the man to get on the ground, the affidavit states. The man continued to approach Robertson and he fired the stun gun and hit him in the chest, according to the affidavit.

He went down and immediately got up and continued to come at Robertson while saying, "I'm Jesus Christ, and I have to get rid of the Devil," according to the affidavit.

Robertson fired his stun gun twice more at the man who continued toward the deputy while pulling the leads out, according to the affidavit. Robertson stunned the man again and then took him to the ground where the man continued to try and get Robertson's gun, and Robertson continued to stun him, according to the affidavit.

Jack Sanders, a paramedic, and Adam Kinney, an Avoca firefighter, arrived and helped Robertson handcuff the man, according to the affidavit.

The man was identified as Trammell, and one of the girls was his daughter and the other one was his niece, according to court documents.

Michael Hopping, the son of the property owner, told deputies he heard the pickup coming up the driveway at a high rate of speed and two girls were on the tool box in the back. They were thrown after it hit a trailer, according to the affidavit.

An accident reconstruction crew determined the pickup was traveling at 60 mph when it struck a wood burning stove outside the residence, a pickup bed trailer and large tree stump before crashing through a fence.

Deputies obtained a sample of Trammell's blood to submit to the Arkansas Crime Laboratory.

Trammell's 11-year-old-daughter was transported by helicopter to a Springfield, Mo. hospital and treated for a brain bleed and injuries to her rib cage, according to the affidavit. His 10-year-old niece was taken to Northwest Medical Center in Bentonville and treated for abrasions on her legs and arms, according to the affidavit.

Trammell was taken to Mercy Hospital in Rogers and then to the county jail.

Trammell pleaded guilty to first-degree murder in June 2000 in Benton County Circuit Court for the Sept. 26, 1999, killing of his father, Mike Trammell Sr., 37, with a crossbow. Trammell was 15 years old when the incident occurred, and he served time in a juvenile facility before being placed on probation.

Benton County Circuit Judge Robin Green conducted Trammell's bond hearing this morning, but Trammell's latest case will be assigned to Circuit Judge Brad Karren.

Green will recuse from the case since she was Benton County prosecutor when Trammell pleaded guilty to killing his father.

Trammell's arraignment is scheduled for 8 a.m. Aug. 13 in Karren's court.

NW News on 07/12/2018

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